Who Is… Samantha Power?

Samantha Power addresses reporters on evidence of Syrian chemical weapons attacks collected by U.N. investigators.-photo by: Stan Honda

Personal Background and Education

Ambassador Power was born in Dublin, Ireland, and immigrated to the U.S. with her family at the age of nine.  She holds a B.A. from Yale University and a J.D. from Harvard Law School.  Power’s first profession was that of field journalist.  She covered the Yugoslav Wars and reported from Rwanda and Sudan.  Power was later the Founding Executive Director of the Carr Center for Human Rights Policy at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government from 1998 to 2002.  Here, she also became the Ann Lindh Professor of Practice of Global Leadership and Public Policy.  She is married to Cass Sunstein, and they have two children.

Professional Experience

On August 2nd, 2013, Dr. Samantha Power became the acting U.S. Permanent Representative to the UN (she replaced Susan Elizabeth Rice as the nominee in June) and a member of President Obama’s Cabinet.  Dr. Power’s previous posts under the Obama administration include Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights on the National Security Council from 2009 to 2013.  During this time she also directed the fledgeling Atrocities Prevention Board. In these positions, Power directed efforts toward UN reform, advocated for LGBT and women’s rights,  addressed human trafficking and the safeguarding of religious minorities.

Now, in case you are feeling a bit winded just from reading a resume (I know I am), there is a reason why Power’s work, and resulting appointment as U.N. Ambassador, is so crucial to organizations like Living Ubuntu and the victimized and oppressed around the globe… her unwavering commitment to human rights, specifically in the Middle East, North Africa, Sudan and Burma.

Read more of this post

An Evening With Carl Wilkens & a documentary on Roméo Dallaire

Hi everyone,

We have a couple of very exciting events coming up next week.  On Friday Oct 9th, we are screening Shake Hands With The Devil, a documentary that follows General Roméo Dallaire during his first return trip to Rwanda, on the 10th anniversary of the genocide, revisiting the killing fields that still haunt him today.  It is a gut-wrenching extraordinary account by a primary witness.

Then on Saturday Oct 10th, we are hosting An Evening With Carl Wilkens.  Carl was the only American who chose to remain in Rwanda when the genocide began in 1994.  He is a warm, heartfelt speaker and we are honored to have him come visit us in Orange County.

We hope you will join us for both events.  All information is below.  We promise you will have a moving and inspiring experience.

Barbara & Anshul
Orange County for Darfur, a project of Living Ubuntu
http://ocfordarfur.org

An Evening With Carl Wilkens

An Evening With Carl Wilkens

Carl Wilkens, former head of Adventist Development and Relief Agency International (ADRA) in Rwanda, was the only American to remain in Rwanda when the genocide began in 1994.

Saturday, October 10 2009
7:00p

Irvine United Congregational Church
4915 Alton Parkway
Irvine, California 92604

Cost:
Free

Click here to watch the trailer

Join us to hear Carl’s personal and chilling first-hand account of life for the people of Rwanda as their country collapsed. The evening will highlight what we as global citizens have in common, how our commonalities are so much greater than our differences and what that means for our response to violence – from bullying to genocide.

Please visit http://livingubuntu.org/events for more information.  RSVPs immensely appreciated.

* * *

Shake Hands With The Devil
The Journey of Roméo Dallaire

Shake Hands With The Devil

Winner of 2007 Emmy Award, Best Documentary

Friday, October 9 2009
7:00p

Irvine United Congregational Church
4915 Alton Parkway
Irvine, California 92604

Cost:
Free

In 1993, General Dallaire was thrown into a country with only minimal briefing, leading a force that included ill equipped, poorly trained soldiers, some of whom did not want to be there.  Unsupported by UN headquarters, Dallaire and his remaining handful of soldiers were incapable of stopping the killing. This documentary follows Dallaire during his first return trip to Rwanda, early in April 2004 on the 10th anniversary of the genocide, revisiting the killing fields that still haunt him today.

Please visit http://livingubuntu.org/events for more information.  Please RSVP.


###