Finding peace: When security comes at too high a price (Saturday, Oct 30th)

Hi everyone,

The rapes in Congo continue.  Elections in Burma are coming up and they will hardly be free or fair.  The Southern Sudanese will decide early next year whether they want to stay part of a unified Sudan.  Will the genocidal Bashir government allow this?  Meanwhile we continue to spend billions of dollars in our wars in Iraq, Afghanistan.  Israel and Palestine seem no closer to an peaceful agreement.

Why is peace so elusive?

“National security” has been the top priority for us as long as I can remember.  Even in these tough economic times, we continue to increase our defense budget.  Our technology and weapons keep getting better and better.  Yet, have we gotten more safe and secure?  Have we built a more peaceful and cohesive society that allows for us to treat each other with more civility and acceptance?  Why is it easier to vent our anger and rage, but not grieve the innumerable losses we have all faced?

Our challenge in Living Ubuntu has always been to attempt to address some of these underlying questions.  It is our deepest conviction that unless we begin to tackle the emotional wounds beneath such issues, we will not find any lasting solutions. There are no shortcuts in life.  We need to get beyond the myopia of short-term thinking and begin to tackle the root causes of these problems.

On Saturday, October 30th, I hope you will join us for Finding Peace: When security comes at too high a price. Our very own Barbara English will be presenting this next workshop in our collaborative series with The Southern California Institute for Bioenergetic Analysis (SCIBA).  All details are below and on the website.

Thank you.

Anshul Mittal
Orange County for Darfur, a project of Living Ubuntu
ocfordarfur.org | blog | facebook

Finding Peace
When security comes at too high a price
by
Barbara English

Finding Peace.  Workshop by Barbara English

presented by

Living Ubuntu
Southern California Institute for Bioenergetic Analysis

Saturday, October 30 2010
9:30a – 1:00p

University of San Diego
Manchester Conference Center
5998 Alcala Park I
San Diego, CA 92110

Why is “insecurity” so common in our culture?  Why do we stay in meaningless jobs and settle for unfulfilling relationships?  Does the familiar really provide safety?  How does this play out at the societal level?  Why does “national security” trump everything else?

Join us for this presentation where we tackle the deep-seated reasons behind our quest for “security” that is so pervasive in our society.
This is a not-for-profit event.  No one will be turned away for lack of funds.

Advance registration is required.  Please visit http://livingubuntu.org/events for more information.

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If a person has been subject to repeated attacks, he will erect defenses to their danger in the future.  Nations do the same thing with military establishments.  In time, both on a personal level as well as on the national one, maintaining defenses becomes part of the way of life.  However, the existence of defenses maintains the fear of attack, and so one feels justified in further strengthening the defensive position.  But defenses also close one in, with the end result that an individual becomes imprisoned behind his own defensive structure.  If he makes no effort to get out, he will remain relatively free from anxiety behind his walls.

– Alexander Lowen

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Why is saying “I can’t” so difficult?

“Unfortunately, most people do not stop to feel their tiredness. Faced with the pressures of life, they believe that it is a matter of survival to go on as they have been. Feeling tired raises a deep fear that they may not be able to continue the struggle. Many find it difficult to say, ‘I can’t.’ As children, they were taught that where there’s a will, there’s a way. To say, ‘I can’t,’ is to admit failure, which is seen as evidence that they are unworthy of love.”

– Alexander Lowen

Hi everyone,

No time to think, No time to Breathe... Is this Me? (Saturday,  June 5th)

We still have space available for No time to think, No time to breathe… Is this me? this coming Saturday, June 5th. I really hope you will join us, and here’s why.

It has become commonplace to joke about our crazy-busy-multi-tasking-non-stop-over-scheduled lives, yet how did we get to this place of taking it so lightly? Are we really willing to collapse into resignation and say, this is just the reality of life in current day society? We accept overwhelm as the new norm?

What is this driven-ness to be super-human, defy all limits, and push beyond our natural reservoir of energy?

We are in trouble when start using our emergency inner resources on a day-to-day basis just to get by. The good news / bad news is we can adapt to ever increasing demands really well, but not without paying the horribly destructive price that we stop feeling what we are really doing to ourselves. Eventually we reach exhaustion . . . of course we might not even notice that. Sometimes we just get numb and stop feeling. Despite the exhaustion we just keep going because we don’t feel much of anything anymore. We fail to recognize the self-cruelty in this, and the result of vicarious traumas we have yet to process.

Our bodies were designed to push and stop, run and rest, exert and recuperate, expand and contract. When we stop abiding by the rhythm of life itself, we lose the ability to know our own inner state, think creatively, and grow in consciousness. We also lose the ability to resonate with one another and the greater world around us. We sacrifice our capacity for that which is ultimately human, to relate, bond, connect, empathize, care and love.

None of us deserves this sort of mistreatment. And we will all pay a hefty price if it persists. We need to push the “pause button” and get re-centered. We all need some help with figuring out how to do this.

I hope you will join us this Saturday. If there is any financial hardship, please do let us know. This workshop series is a service to the community and no one will be turned away for lack of funds.

Barbara Engilsh
Living Ubuntu
livingubuntu.org | blog | facebook

No time to think, No time to breathe…

Is this me?

by

Tarra Stariell

No time to think, No time to breathe... Is this me?

presented by

Living Ubuntu
Southern California Institute for Bioenergetic Analysis

Saturday, June 5 2010
9:00a – 12:00p

University of San Diego
Manchester Conference Center
5998 Alcala Park I
San Diego, CA 92110

Why is it so hard to keep up? Where is the time for me? Why do I feel so lost in my own life?

Join us for a workshop about our overwhelmed lives and how to find our way back to a healthy balance. This is a not-for-profit event. No one will be turned away for lack of funds.

Advance registration is required. Please visit http://livingubuntu.org/events for more information.

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