What does a small child have to do to survive in South Kordofan, Sudan?

Children in Kauda, South Kordofan, Sudan, shelter from a passing Antonov, 2012. Photograph: Peter Moszynski

Hi everyone,

What does a small child have to do to survive in South Kordofan, Sudan?  This photo says it all.  How can we possibly even begin to imagine what it is really like for them to be in this horrific situation?  The accompanying question is, why do we continue to do so little to help them?

An eerie silence suddenly descends upon Kauda’s market as people scan the skies for the source of the distant yet all-too-familiar throb of Soviet-manufactured plane engines.

“Antonov!” the cry goes out, and people scatter, diving into the nearest hole or scrambling for cover wherever they can. After a few minutes the engines fade and people get up, dust themselves off and attempt to get on with what passes for normality for the beleaguered inhabitants of Sudan‘s Nuba mountains.

“Women and children usually constitute the largest number of casualties from these bombing raids,” says Ahmed Kafi, local co-ordinator for one of the few international NGOs that still maintains a presence on the ground. “Most of the men and older children learned long ago to take cover when they hear an Antonov approaching, but the younger ones often run in panic and there is nothing in the world that can prevent a mother from chasing after her children.”

From “World again turns blind eye to people of Sudan’s Nuba mountains,” by Peter Moszynski

Then this morning’s news:  Two Antonovs dropped 28 bombs in the town of Kauda in South Kordofan.  Amazingly, no one was reported as having been killed.  A few days ago in the village of Eieri a family of five was not as lucky.  They were killed.

Here is one little helpful thing you can do.  Ask the UNSC, AU and US to Provide Civilian Protection in Sudan. To sign the petition, click here.

Thank you.

Barbara English
Executive Director, Living Ubuntu
http://livingubuntu.org
(949) 891-2005

IDPs To Boycott US Envoy

Unless he changes his position and takes account of our demands, he is not welcomed in our camps because he does not consider us.

Those words were spoken by a representative of Darfur’s internally displaced persons, who have decided against meeting US special envoy to Sudan Scott Gration when he visits their camps.

The IDPs feel that Gration has “ignored their demand for security” and refused to acknowledge Darfur for what it is – a humanitarian crisis.

Put simply by the representative -

It is better for President Obama to appoint someone else.

Many in the US agree with this view of Gration and what he has accomplished (or hasn’t accomplished). Several had high hopes when he was appointed. Now, many are left wanting more.

Text Secretary of State Clinton

US Special Envoy to Sudan Scott Gration has asked for an “easing” of sanctions against the country.

Help the Enough project’s efforts to keep sanctions in place  -

Text Hillary Clinton at 90822 - “DO NOT END SUDAN SANCTIONS WITHOUT REAL PROGRESS”.

Darfur – Only “Remnants of Genocide”

What we see is the remnants of genocide.

Those words were spoken today by US Special Envoy to Sudan Scott Gration whose recent trip to Darfur did not convince him that a genocide is TAKING place – only that a genocide TOOK place.

Gration also remarked that the humanitarian gap caused by Sudan’s expulsion of major aid groups in March has been “essentially closed”.

Perhaps Gration is simply trying to exhibit optimism. Perhaps he’s out to improve the image of Sudan.

Whatever the reason behind his words today, I’m left confused.

Just two days ago, US Ambassador to the UN Susan Rice called Darfur a present “genocide”. Less than two weeks ago, the man who appointed Gration, US President Barack Obama, referred to Darfur as a “genocide that’s taking place”.

How can people working together lack consensus on something like this? Yes, Darfur was a genocide in 2003. It was a genocide in 2006. And it is a genocide today. The means of carrying out the genocide may have changed but the motive is the same.

“Obligation” to End Genocide

While in Germany this Friday, US President Barack Obama plans to visit Buchenwald, a former Nazi concentration camp. As he prepared for the tour, Obama discussed current efforts to end the genocide in Sudan -

The phrase “never again” means that the international community has an obligation even when it’s inconvenient to act when genocide is occurring.

That’s two days in a row that Obama has mentioned Darfur as he travels the world.

The E6 Envoys

Through their envoys to Sudan, six global powers have called for Chad and Sudan to “exercise restraint”.

The “E6 Envoys” represent the US, UK, Russia, France, EU, and China. The group met Wednesday in Doha, Qatar.

According to reports, they “recognized the negative impact on the Darfur political process of the current escalation of tension between Sudan and Chad” and “underlined the need for continued efforts to address humanitarian needs in Darfur and other parts of Sudan”.

 

China and US Discuss Darfur

There have been “positive” talks between the US and China about the Darfur crisis and peace between North and South Sudan.

In Beijing, US special envoy to Sudan Scott Gration and China’s special representative for Darfur “discussed deepening US-China cooperation over shared concerns in Sudan”.

Many believe China’s support is key to ending the suffering in Sudan – with it being an “ally of the regime, military supplier, and importer of oil”.

Cooperation between the two countries will include maintaining communication and exchanging information.

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